Reply to a post below.

Profile picture Rich Martinez
The Draft
Regardless if we:--served--dodged--or lucked out with deferrments--Vietnam directly, or indirectly influenced our destiny.
I was scheduled to graduate Northwestern Dental School June '69. Since I had not been drafted by Dec '68, I was certain I had beaten the Devil. Confidently, I purchased a dental practice in a brand new suburb called Northglenn (does it still exist?)
In March '69 I was drafted. This gave me 3 months to resale the practice, graduate, and report to basic training.
There was a shortage of Medics, so all doctors and dentists were drafted to fill this void--probably because we would be least likely to faint in the presence of blood.
Three weeks after we were deployed somewhere along the Cambodian border, 'THE MAN' realized he had committed a major faux pas. All medical and dental draftees were given credit for their 8 years of schooling, therefore, we were drafted with the commissioned rank of Captain.
Medics are non-commisioned officers. OOPS! They could not assign Captains as Medics--Rules are Rules. Since we were not trained as combat Captains to lead the infantry, we were of little other use-- but a Captain is a Captain.
To prevent an embarrassing situation, they tranferred us to the US Public Health Service-Coast Guard Division-- where we completed our remaining 2 years of draft obligation.
The upside is: the GI Bill paid for me to return to Northwestern for a Masters degree and specialty training in Children's Dentistry.
I was assistant professor at Northwestern from '73-78, and woke up one morning and decided I would rather treat patients than attend any more 'ad hoc' committee meetings and deal with tenured academicians.
For the last 30 years I have been trying to return to Colorado, but after marrying a Chicago girl, I realized what we guys know, but will never admit--WOMEN RULE--(they control most of our money, and all of the sex)
So, I am still in Chicago, trying to decide whether to be thankful, or bitch about being drafted.
Profile picture Peter Wilcox Re: The Draft
Hi Rich

I think you're right - Viet Nam, and more directly avoiding the draft, directly affected and influenced most of the life decisions I made - until I was drafted in 1969. :>)

The draft also helped get us out of Viet Nam, causing huge social unrest among those directly affected, unable to control and plan our futures, and faced with the prospect of death or serious injury at the hands of politicians controlled by special interests.

Unfortunately, not much has changed today, except it's a volunteer army (though the National Guardsmen are getting screwed), and there's no group of people in American society adversely and unavoidably affected by the wars, as were the potential draftees and their families.

Except for the downturn in the economy, Americans are sitting pretty, as if there were no wars or carnage at all.

Sorry about the rant. I guess I'm still pissed, though in the end my military exposure certainly had a beneficial effect on the rest of my life: however, many others can't say the same - or can't say anything at all.

As Ed Tipper used to say (remember him?), regarding his war experience, something like "I wouldn't take a million dollars for the experience, and I wouldn't do it again if you gave me a million dollars."
Profile picture Rich Martinez Re: The Draft

pwilcox wrote:

"Hi Rich I think you're right - Viet Nam, and more directly avoiding the draft, directly affected and influenced most of the life decisions I made - until I was drafted in 1969. :>) The draft also helped get us out of Viet Nam, causing huge soci"
Hey Pete--I'll be by your side if they attempt to drag us to the Nursing Home. My only concern is that if there are enough of us Resistors to create an actual Movement, there could be a dearth of nursing home residents. You don't think the 'MAN' is cruel enough to repeat '69 and impose a Nursing Home Draft?
Profile picture Sarah Chandler Re: The Draft

charlesrmartinez wrote:

"Hey Pete--I'll be by your side if they attempt to drag us to the Nursing Home. My only concern is that if there are enough of us Resistors to create an actual Movement, there could be a dearth of nursing home residents. You don't think the 'MAN' is"
If that happens, I invite you both to come to Canada and claim asylum :-)